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3 reasons why curiosity is a superpower

Curiosity didn’t kill the cat.

 

We often hear messages which let’s face it, aren’t the most positive about asking questions. Anybody who’s been on the receiving end of a two year old’s interrogation knows how quickly things can escalate into chaos. Often, it’s tempting to prioritise knowledge and expertise over curiosity and exploration.

Knowledge and expertise are (rightfully) highly valued, but, here’s 3 reasons why curiosity is the superpower you didn’t know you had:

 

  1. Asking questions isn’t a weakness, it actually shows you’re pretty engaged and want to lift the lid. But remember, it’s not always what you ask. It’s how you ask it (and if we’re getting really deep, it’s being aware of why you’re asking it too). The same goes for giving feedback, imagine a world in which you didn’t tell someone what to do, you asked them ‘what if…?’ turning feedback into a springboard for new ideas.

 

  1. Not being an expert is pretty liberating, if we all knew everything all of the time life would be pretty boring. In fact, the more comfortable we are in knowing what we don’t know the more rounded projects become. Being curious to ask “what don’t I know that I need to find out?” and collaborating with others to plug the gaps helps create a culture of openness, trust and ultimately enhances what you’re able to achieve.

 

  1. Guardrails are great but it doesn’t mean they’re always right, by giving our curiosity freedom to explore we create opportunities that we didn’t know existed. Getting from A to B is important but we like our tools and methods to work with you, providing just enough support to keep you focussed but enough flex to give you time to reflect, explore, change path, loop back and sometimes start all over again.

 

So, we’re agreed, curiosity is your new life mission. But how do you do it?

 

A good place start in encouraging curiosity is to be aware of your intellectual baggage and be brave in wiping the slate clean. It’s why we like to start all projects with an “Assumption Dump”, a method for clearing your mind of what you think you know. That’s why we’ve made our Assumption Dump tool, as well as a host of other innovation tools, completely free. Our STEAMhouse Toolbox is an open-source innovation toolbox of collaborative methods and activities to help you understand problems and create new products, services or projects in response.

 

So what are you waiting for? Get Assumption Dumping right away!

By the end of the exercise, you should have a better picture of your own headspace enabling you to park the baggage and experience projects or problems with an open, curious mind.

 

Access the toolbox, for free, here!