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Daniella Genas, Birmingham City University (BCU) alumna and award-winning founder of She’s the Boss International, discusses the small business workshops she is hosting at BCU, women in business and her top tips for entrepreneurs.

Boosting business growth and profits

Daniella founded She’s the Boss International in 2017, with the aim of equipping ambitious entrepreneurs with the tools and guidance needed to build successful businesses.

Since then, Daniella has provided support to a variety of businesses from a wide range of industries.

Her programmes are proven to accelerate business growth up to 75 percent, with some businesses going on to achieve six-figure growth.

Daniella has been recognised for her great work, winning multiple awards.

Daniella Genas Shes the Boss Environmental Business Portraits in Birmingham by Lensi Photography

 

Small business workshops that make a difference

Daniella is hosting a series of workshops at BCU over the year.

The workshops – which focus on marketing, business building, risk analysis and more – complement one another and are designed to ensure businesses are structured and prepared for all eventualities.

Her workshops provide practical advice, guidance and information on how to build better businesses, hosted in an interactive and engaging way.

“I involve participants by using a range of activities, Q & As, polls, and real-life examples and case studies,” Daniella explains.

“Participants ask a lot of questions and share the challenges that they have been facing in business. That’s one of my favourite parts of delivering the workshops – the participants’ interactions with one another.”

Practical advice for small businesses

Daniella has already hosted a small business workshop this year, providing organisations with a practical framework for developing a three-year vision.

“So many business owners always start the session by saying they have a vision for their business. However, it soon becomes apparent that their vision is hazy and needs a lot of work,” she explains.

Her next workshop is taking place on Monday 7 March in partnership with the Higher Level Skills Match Extension (HLSME) project, part-funded by the European Social Fund.

The workshop, Stop Targeting Everybody, does what it says on the tin.

“When I ask small business owners who their target audience is, they will usually reply ‘everybody’”, Daniella says.

“Targeting everybody can result in actually targeting nobody, negatively impacting the business. The workshop will share why this is problematic, as well as how to refine your target audience and how to attract them.”

Giving back to BCU

Working with BCU has been a natural choice for Daniella, who has studied three separate degrees at the institution.

She also looked to the University for support and guidance when launching her first business.

“I feel like a member of the BCU family and will work with them forever if they’ll have me,” Daniella explains. “I owe them a lot for setting me on the path to entrepreneurship.

“Having the opportunity to provide advice to small businesses and entrepreneurs, many of whom are in the same position as I was when I started out, really excites me.”

Daniella also speaks excitedly about STEAMhouse and what it offers up-and-coming businesses.

“I love its ethos,” she beams. “I have worked with a number of companies who have been part of STEAMhouse’s programmes. I’m really excited about the new space and all the great stuff they have coming up.”

Building resilience as a woman in business

Tuesday 8 March marks International Women’s Day, and last year leading entrepreneur and BCU academic Adila Khan spoke about challenging convictions and breaking glass ceilings.

It’s a subject that is also close to Daniella’s heart.

“Throughout my entrepreneurial journey, I’ve been overlooked and underestimated because I’m a woman,” she says.

“As a black woman, I have also dealt with the intersectionality of sexism and racism.”

Despite this, Daniella insists that she wouldn’t change those experiences for anything.

“They have made me stronger, and more determined to succeed and be a role model for women like me,” she says.

“I have built my resilience and focused on being my best, rather than allowing small-minded people to knock me off my path.”

Daniella insists that no women in business should feel that they are not good enough.

“Being a woman is a superpower, not a hindrance,” she says. “Do not let anyone tell you differently. Always think big, take action and keep pushing.”

Interested in attending Daniella’s small business workshops? Check out the BCU Advatage event page to find out more.